David  Goldberg

David Goldberg

Associate Professor

313-577-2321

313-577-6929 (fax)

cu4197@wayne.edu

David Goldberg

Research Interest/Area of Expertise

  • Black social movements

  • Black labor history

  • Black urban history

  • Black Detroit

  • Black radicalism

  • Civil rights and black power movements

  • Black intellectual history, and race, labor and the law

Research

My research focuses on the nexus between Black working class activism and Black social movements. My first book, Black Power at Work, was an edited volume that chronicled the organizations and protests  that paved the way for the development of affirmative action and Black access to the llily-white construction industry and its trade unions. My second book, Black Firefighters  and the FDNY: The Struggle for Jobs, Justice and Equity in New York City, will be released by University of North Carolina Press in fall, 2017.

At present, I am working on a biography of legendary Detroit revolutionary, General Baker, a founding member of the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement (DRUM), the League of Revolutionary Black Workers (LRBW), The Communist League, and the League of Revolutionaries for a New America who consistently fought on behalf working people and the socially, poltiically, and economically disadvantaged both locally and internationally.

Education – Degrees, Licenses, Certifications

  • B.A. in African American Studies and History, Eastern Michigan University, 1996.
  • M.A. in African Diaporic History, Morgan State University, 1998.
  • M.A. in African American Studies, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 2003.
  • Ph.D. in African American Studies, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 2006.

Awards and Grants

  • 2006-2007, Chancellor's Postdoctoral Research Fellow, African American Research Program, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

    2009-2010: President's Urban Research Enhancement Grant, Wayne State University.

    2010: Humanities Center, Summer Research Fellow, Wayne State University.

    2012-13: National Endowment for the Humanities/Mellon Foundation Scholar-in-Residency, Schomburg Center for Research in the Black Culture, New York, N.Y. 

Selected Publications

Books

David Goldberg and Trevor Griffey, Black Power at Work: Community Control, Affirmative Action and the Construction Industry (Ithaca: ILR/Cornell University Press, 2010).

David Goldberg, Black Firefighters and the FDNY: The Struggle for Jobs, Justice, and Equity in New York City (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press), (forthcoming, December, 2017).

 

Chapters in books

David Goldberg, “Community Control of Construction, Independent Unionism, and the 'Short Black Power Movement' in Detroit,” in Goldberg and Griffey, eds., Black Power at Work: Community Control, Affirmative Action and the Construction Industry. (Ithaca: ILR/Cornell University Press, 2010), 90-111.

David Goldberg, “From Landless to Landlords: The Cooptation of Detroit’s Tenants’ Rights   Movement, 1964-1969,” in Julia Rabig and Laura Warren Hill, eds., The Business of Black Power: Corporations, Public Policy, and Community Development (Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2012), 157-183.

David Goldberg & Trevor Griffey, “Introduction: Constructing Black Power,” in Black Power at Work: Community Control, Affirmative Action and the Construction Industry. (Ithaca: ILR/Cornell University Press, 2010), 1-22.

David Goldberg & Trevor Griffey, “Conclusion: White Male Identity Politics, the Building Trades, and the Future of American Labor,” in Black Power at Work: Community Control, Affirmative Action and the Construction Industry. (Ithaca: ILR/Cornell University Press, 2010), 189-208.

 

Articles in non-referred journals

David Goldberg, “Detroit’s Radical: General Gordon Baker,” Jacobin, (May 17, 2014): https://www.jacobinmag.com/2014/05/detroit-s-radical-general-baker

Currently Teaching

  • AFS/HIS 3180: Black Social Movements

  • AFS/HIS 3160: Black Urban History

Courses taught

  • AFS 2210: Black Social and Political Thought
  • AFS 2250: Black Detroit
  • AFS/HIS 3160: Black Urban History
  • AFS-HIS 3180: Black Social Movements
  • AFS/HIS 3360: Black Workers in the U.S.
  • AFS/HIS 5320: Black Labor History