Rita Casey

Rita Casey

Associate Professor

313-577-2856

313-577-7636 (fax)

r.casey@wayne.edu

 7304, 5057 Woodward

Curriculum Vitae

Rita Casey

Research Interest/Area of Expertise

  •  Research Area: Emotional development & the emergence of psychopathology in child and adolescent development. Current projects focus on 1) mental health of persons who care for or teach children, and the effects on children if those persons are depressed; 2) How do emotions influence the way that adults make decisions about children? 3) “Real world” prevention of psychological problems for children, and 4) relations between emotion regulation and executive function.

    I have a long-standing interest in how schooling is organized for children, including the role it plays in the larger environment of children and families, particularly in the context of ongoing disorganization and defunding of public education.

    An additional area of interest/expertise is the inclusion of multi-cultural representation in research on children and families in the U.S. and beyond, through the intersection of psychological and anthropological methodology in the study of human development.

Research

 Current projects include the development of treatment or prevention interventions for teachers who are having high levels of depression symptoms; the role of social-emotional curricula on the academic adjustment of children; new interventions for adults who have difficulty with depressive symptoms; the effectiveness of deliberate reflection as an addend to CBT for adolescents. 

Education – Degrees, Licenses, Certifications

  • Ph.D. Psychology, 1998, University of Texas at Austin

Selected Publications

      SEIVERT, N. P., Cano, A., Casey, R. J., Johnson, A., & MAY, D. K. (In press). Animal

assisted therapy for incarcerated youth: A randomized controlled trial, Applied

Developmental Science, p.1-15. Advanced online publication, October 10, 2016.

doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1234935.

     MAY, D, SEIVERT, N. P., Cano. A., Casey, R. J., and Johnson, A. (2016). Animal-

assisted therapy for youth: a systematic methodological critique. Human Animal

Interaction Bulletin, 4(1), 1-18.

     JANUARY, A., Casey, R., & PAULSON, D. (2013). Classroom-wide

interventions to build social skills: do they work? School Psychology Review, 40,

242-256.

Currently Teaching

  • Winter, 2017:  Psychology 2400:  Life Span Human Development.

Courses taught

 Fall, 2016:  Psychology 2400: Life Span Human Development (Honors Section)

                    Psychology 4310:  Child and Adolescent Behavior Disorders

Winter, 2016: Psychology 4310: Child and Adolescent Behavior Disorders